The Transformation of Angela Stokes. Video and Test.

This is a video about Angela Stokes, a woman who went on a raw food diet. The transcrip and a comprehension quiz are included, as well as some vocabulary notes.

MALE PRESENTER: If you are trying to lose some weight before Christmas, throw away your cookery is the answer. If that sounds a little drastic, listen to Angela Stokes, from Brighton.

FEMALE PRESENTER: Yes, what a transformation! Three years ago she weighed 21 stone. After reading a book, she began a diet of raw food.

MALE PRESENTER: Mmm, Tasty!

FEMALE PRESENTER: Mmm! Today she is a size ten. It sounds simple, doesn’t it? Or does it? Ian Palmer has more.

IAN PALMER: The hand that stopped the ladle. Cooked vegetables never pass her lips. Angela stokes likes her food au natural. The benefit of her change in lifestyle was felt almost immediately.

ANGELA STOKES: Within the first month, I think, of me going raw, I had my first boyfriend in five years. So yeah, that was really wonderful.

IAN PALMER: It’s hard to believe it’s the same woman. This is Angela just three years ago. She was 21 stones in weight. At 24 she was unhappy to the point of depression. She also had a number of skin and health problems.

After digesting a book about raw food in one evening, Angela decided to stop her bad eating habits. The weight began to fall off.

ANGELA STOKES: In the first year, I lost 7 and a half stone. So, which is kind of like a person. I lost like a person off of my body in the first year.

Two years on and the 27 year old is 9 stone in weight. Held against her Angela’s old clothes look like they belonged to someone else. So how does it work? Emma Wells is a food nutritionist. Her company gives advice and guidance to people with diet-related problems.

EMMA WELLS: I think mainly they work because people are cutting out some of the bad food groups, like the sugars, the alcohol… People are also cutting down on wheat and pasta. Also the starchy vegetables, like the potatoes or the rice, they are reduced, or well, eliminated, and they are really high in calories, but they don’t really leave many nutrients. So that’s the main reason why it works.

IAN PALMER: So what does a raw food diet really mean? Well, a typical day would begin with a sultana, banana, and sunflower seed breakfast. Lunch is a salad containing sea veg, kale and dehydrated crackers. The evening could be a seaweed roll filled with olives, avocado and sliced veg. And lastly, for a special snack, raw chocolate.

For Angela, and others like her, eating raw is about energy. They call it living food. For anyone wishing to adopt a healthy lifestyle, it is certainly something to chew on. Ian Palmer, BBC South East Today, Brighton.

MALE PRESENTER: I don’t know whether it’s tasty but it does seem to work.

“Three years ago she weighed 21 stone.
A stone= In British English they usually use stone to measure or mention our weight. One stone is 6.35 kilograms, which means that 21 stone is 133 kilograms.

“After reading a book, she began a diet of raw food.
Raw food= food that has not been cooked.

“Mmm, Tasty!”
Tasty= delicious.

“The hand that stopped the ladle.
Ladle= a big spoon used to serve soup. The reporter talks about Angela Stokes as the hand that stopped the ladle, because Angela stopped cooking and started her diet on raw food.

“Angela stokes likes her food au natural.”
Au natural= is an expression that comes from French and means natural, without chemical or other substances added.

“Within the first month, I think, of me going raw, I had my first boyfriend in five years.”
To go raw= to begin a raw diet.

“Emma Wells is a food nutritionist.”
A food nutritionist= an expert on food and nutrition.

“Her company gives advice and guidance to people with diet-related problems.”
Diet-related problems= problems related to diet. This is a compound noun, which mean two or more nouns used together. We could also say work-related problems or stress-related problems, etc.

“I think mainly they work because people are cutting out some of the bad food groups, like the sugars, the alcohol…”
To cut out something= to eliminate, to stop eating, drinking or using. Compare with the verb ‘cut down’, which appears in the following sentence.

“People are also cutting down on wheat and pasta.”
To cut down on something= to reduce the amount or number of something that you eat, drink or use. So if you cut down on something, as for example pasta, that means that you eat less pasta, and if you cut out pasta, you stop eating pasta.
Wheat= wheat is the plant used to make flour (flour is the white powder used to make bread)

“Also the starchy vegetables, like the potatoes or the rice, they are reduced.”
Starchy= it means ‘containing a lot of starch’, and starch is the white substance that we find for example in potatoes.

“Wheat and pasta are really high in calories, but they don’t really leave many nutrients.
High in calories= very caloric, containing a lot of calories.
Nutrients= the substance that all animals or plants need to live.

“Well, a typical day would begin with a sultana, banana, and sunflower seed breakfast.”
Sultanas= are a variety of raisins or dried grapes.
Sunflower seeds= are the seeds of the sunflower, which are very popular for example in Spain. People eat them at football matches. But in other countries they are usually just considered food for birds.

“Lunch is a salad containing sea veg, kale and dehydrated crackers. “
Sea veg= veg stands for ‘vegetables’, so sea veg are ‘sea vegetables’
Kale= a type of vegetable used in salads, which has good green or purple curled leaves.
Cracker= this is very common in the UK or the USA, it’s like a crisp, but made of flour, and it is often eaten with cheese.

“The evening could be a seaweed roll filled with olives, avocado and sliced veg.”
Seaweed= plants that we find in the sea.
A seaweed roll= is like a cannelloni, but made with seaweed leaves instead of pasta. And to fill with olives means to put olives in.

Listen and/or download the recording of the vocabulary notes


Download the mp3 file

Leave a Reply

Dictionary
  • dictionary
  • diccionario
  • English Spanish Dictionary

Double click on any word on the page or type a word:

Powered by DictionaryBox.com